The basics we've gone over in this blog post are just the beginning. Keep creating great offers, CTAs, landing pages, and forms — and promote them in multi-channel environments. Be in close touch with your sales team to make sure you're handing off high-quality leads on a regular basis. Last but not least, never stop testing. The more you tweak and test every step of your inbound lead generation process, the more you'll improve lead quality and increase revenue.
Before you can talk to a prospect and start generating interest, you need to know and understand your company, product line and compensation plan. Being educated will give you more confidence when you are talking to your leads because you will be able to answer questions, overcome objections and determine the potential fit with your prospect. Now, this does NOT mean you have to explain everything about your business. you simply need to know where to point them. Having a link to a video about your compensation plan will save you time and frustration of trying to explain it over the phone. You also want to use whatever resources and tools your company has to lessen the amount of talking you have to do on the phone.
ROI on PPC ads is typically very good. You can deploy and retire ads on a whim, and adjust budgets anytime you like. If you see that an ad is performing very well, and want to increase its visibility or target more similar phrases, you can increase its daily budget in less than a minute. And because of all the reporting options available, you can see exactly how your ads are performing – and how many leads you’re generating – at a glance.
The aspects of your lead gen campaign should mirror everything else on your website, on your blog, and within the product that you will eventually try to sell. If not, you’ll have a difficult time getting your lead to the next lifecycle stage. Your campaign should be about more than just obtaining an email address — it should be about developing a new customer.
Cost per thousand (e.g. CPM Group, Advertising.com), also known as cost per mille (CPM), uses pricing models that charge advertisers for impressions — i.e. the number of times people view an advertisement. Display advertising is commonly sold on a CPM pricing model. The problem with CPM advertising is that advertisers are charged even if the target audience does not click on (or even view) the advertisement.
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